Insights® Color Focus: Communicating with “a Blue”

Insights discovery blue energy

One of the things I like best about the Insights® Discovery program is the accessibility of the language. Even if you’re not familiar with this science-based assessment tool, it isn’t difficult to familiarize yourself with the basic concept. Essentially: All people have the capacity to behave and think in various ways, but we tend to emphasize or favor some methods over others. For example, outgoing, boisterous people have the capacity to tone down their energy and act discreetly, but they prefer an animated communication style, as opposed to a reserved one.

These tendencies are expressed in four different colors: blue, red, yellow, and green:

4 colors, good day

BLUE is associated with introversion and introspection. People who favor blue tendencies are often analytical, data-driven, and like to think carefully before they speak.

RED is associated with being brief and vocal. People who tend toward red often like to make quick decisions and aren’t afraid to exert their influence or step up as leaders.

YELLOW is associated with high energy and extroversion. Those who lean toward yellow are often highly social, enjoy brain storming sessions, and are generally not afraid to share their ideas.

GREEN is associated with a high level of empathy and awareness of others. Green-leaning people are generally steady and reliable and like to practice inclusivity.

KEEP IN MIND:

I am only barely scratching the surface of the Insights® Discovery model. There are many intricate parts to the model that can help build self-awareness, improve team dynamics, enhance communication, and develop leadership (contact me if you have questions about the potential benefits of Insights® for yourself or your team). However, this overview will give you a stepping stone for the focus of this blog post: communicating with someone who leads with blue energy.

As I touched on above, a blue-leading person is often quiet, analytical, and likes to understand the whole picture before making a decision. This type of personality can be difficult to interpret or communicate with, especially for red- and yellow-leaning individuals who tend toward extraversion and snappy decisions.

If you notice that someone is consistently quiet at company meetings, don’t write him off or assume he’s not interested. Instead, ask him for his input about what was just said. You might find out that he has reservations about a particular project or action because not enough research has been conducted or there are possible alternative routes that could be explored.

Let’s look at another situation. Imagine you are about to have a one-on-one meeting with someone who seems to be blue-leaning. It is best to come prepared with a meeting agenda that includes concrete statistics and thorough research. Keep in mind that a blue-leaning person may have tons of questions, but may be too reserved to ask them. Create a comfortable environment where asking questions is encouraged.

One last scenario: Let’s say you’re working on a team with a blue personality-type. She may not always offer up her ideas, but that doesn’t mean she isn’t a valuable asset! Since blue-leaning people are so good with practical details, your teammate would be great at the planning/logistical side of the project. Make sure she’s able to find her sweet spot within the team.

And what if YOU tend toward “blue?”

Don’t be afraid to ask crucial questions and offer your input. And don’t assume that the rest of the team can see potential flaws like you can. Your analytical abilities and organizational skills are valuable and it’s a great help to your company when you share your insight or ask the questions that need to be asked when considering a new project or task.

This is just a small glimpse into the powerful way Insights® Discovery helps teams connect and communicate. I plan to regularly publish posts focusing on specific Insights® color energies, with the goal of leading you to a greater understanding of yourself and others.

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